Crowdfunding in the Developing world

I wanted to give a quick shout out to the guy at Allied Crowds who map out emerging world crowdfunding. You can find them here. Sign up to read their reports and statistics on crowdfunding in the emerging world. I truly believe that we can use crowdfunding to greatly improve the lives of people in the emerging world.

This is short and sweet and to the point. Check out the reports!!!

Oh, below is Allied Crowds top 20 countries in terms of crowdfunding. Even more reason to visit their website, just click on the picture below.

Allied Crowds Top 20

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A Growing Passion | Crowdfunding | It’s History

As the Internet becomes a more prolific force in the lives of more humans we are definitely going to see greater collaboration using internet enabled platforms. Peter Diamandis speaks of the rising billions in terms of the emerging world’s citizens who are gaining access to the internet. This is extremely exciting as greater access to the internet allows people to collaborate more efficiently. Essentially crowdfunding is human collaboration enabled by Technology. Crowdfunding gives people opportunities that may not have been possible prior to the internet. It is extremely exciting to think about how this can positively affect the emerging world.

If we take a closer look at crowdfunding we will see that this is not a new idea, humans have been collaborating for centuries. Examples of pre-internet crowdfunding are:

  • Praenumeration: Subscription business model used to gauge demand before printing books in the 28th century. Not exactly crowdfunding but similar in terms of getting the crowds approval.
  • War Bonds: This is essentially the crowd funding war
  • Statue of Liberty Base: Joseph Pulitzer’s New York World, raised $102,000 in 1885 from 120,000 donors, with 80 percent of the total received in sums of less than one dollar.
  • Rotating savings and credit association’s, or ROSCA: There are many examples across the world where groups of people get together to pool money for particular purposes.

The foundation of crowdfunding via the internet though can be traced to the British rock group Marillion who in 1997 used donations from fans to pay for their US tour. In the same year writer/director Mark Tapio Kines designed a website to raise funds for his then-unfinished first feature film Foreign Correspondents. It was not really until 2003 when Brian Camelio, a Boston musician and computer programmer, launched ArtistShare that crowdfunding really started gaining traction. Maria Schneider’s jazz album “Concert in a Garden.” was the first project on ArtistShare and the campaign raised about $130,000. She won a 2005 Grammy Award for best large jazz ensemble album. This was the birth of rewards based crowdfunding and sites that we know such as Indiegogo and Kickstarter  launched in 2008 and 2009.

Debt Based crowdfunding saw its roots prior to the establishment of these rewards based platforms with the establishment of Zopa in the UK in 2004/5 and Lending Club in the USA in 2006.  The use of the internet to facilitate the collection of donations was in place long before donation based crowdfunding emerged in 2010 with the launch of  GoFundMe, which has raised over $2Billion to date.

In terms of Equity crowdfunding most information you can find focuses on the Jobs Act and America’s process to equity crowdfunding, EquityNet was founded in 2005 for accredited investors. You may not know that ASSOB took equity investing online in 2005 in Australia or that Crowdcube (founded 2010) and Seedrs (founded 2009) out of the UK are two of the most successful platforms for every man on the street.

This was a quick history and I have tried to make sure that it is as factually correct as possible. If I have made mistakes please comment about it.

This is most likely a good place to mention that I an working for a real estate crowdfunding company and together with some others based in Africa we have established the African Crowdfunding Association (ACfA) as a way to educate more and ensure that crowdfunding can impact Africa in a positive way!!!

 

 

Sunday Rambling | It’s been a while!

Working 7 days a week has become my norm for 2016. I have found that I have quite a resilience and enjoy a life that is full of busyness rather than nothing to do. Working in a scale up business in the fintech space has definitely been worth it to date. I have met awesome people and have had to learn and stretch myself in different areas. I am enjoying being out of the pharmaceutical world; being confined to the box of pharmacist.

I count myself very fortunate for the situation that I currently find myself in. Sure it is definitely not easy or simple but doing something important never is. I have worked hard in order to be in a situation where I can make a difference. So some of the negatives are: personal projects are on the back burner, my body is being neglected, I am not focusing on my social life.

Realising the negatives and ensuring that I do not forget about them and overcoming them is important. People go on about the journey of life and I do want to make sure that I am making the most of it.

Part of my current role has allowed me to look into different companies, researching and learning in order to ensure that we know where we stand in terms of our industry and what we need to do to push forward. Doing this has reminded me how full of information the internet is and how so much information is lost in the enormity of it, for example how this blog is a microscopic speck in the galaxy of the internet. One could look at this in two ways: I am insignificant and therefore should play no role on the internet or wow, there are billions of people who are a potential audience.

I will be sharing some of my internet finds moving forward and plan to take on a more consistent role of sharing online.

So this week I will share a find that was sent to me by our CEO, Scott Picken. If you are interested in start-ups, venture capital and entrepreneurship then check out CB Insights. You can sign up for free for 30 days and you can find out a whole lot of information regarding the funding of companies and more. The info is pulled from the internet and it not completely accurate, I say this as the info on our company is not completely correct.

That is it for today.

 

Striated Skies No. 51 – Namesake

51. Namesake

The St James Catholic Church building in this weeks Striated sky was opened in 1901. The church building was designed by George Ransom and built by Father John Duignam and his Filipino parishioners. The Parish of St James started in 1859 to serve the Filipino community of Kalk Bay. Given the spanish legacy of the community the name St James was chosen in honour of the apostle and fisherman, Patron saint of Spain.

The original building stood where the current station stands. When the train made its was to Kalk Bay in 1883 the church became a stopping point for the train known as St James Church Halt. By 1893 a platform was built known as St James’s. The suburb (which was part of Kalk Bay) took on the name St James. The builsing at the station building grew too small and thus was sold to Cape Government Railways for £2000 in 1900. It was with these proceeds that Fr Duignam was able to build the current building.

In 1924, the Golden Jubilee of Fr. Duignam, the stained-glass window behind the high altar was unveiled to celebrate his service to the parish.  In 1947, under the direction of Father Harold Doran, substantial alterations, including moving the entrance to the current configuration the main road, were completed. Below is a picture of the building before alterations were made.

St James has been a popular beach for many years and still retains its numerous colourful victorian bathing boxes. The suburb is a very trendy place to live and is well worth a visit together with its neighbours on the false bay coast. For more history check out KALK BAY, ST. JAMES – A brief history illustrated with postcards of a bygone era by Michael Walker.

Random Piece of information 

George Ransom also designed the Markham Building, which when completed in 1897 was the tallest building in Johannesburg (Cnr of Eloff and Pritchard). The large clock imported from Scotland has four faces North, South, East and West.  The building was known as Markham’s Folly as it stood out in the centre of Johannesburg with the clock visible for miles. The building housed the second store of Henry William Markham who arrived in Cape Town from England in 1873, setting up a successful outfitter’s business. Markhams was bought by the Foshini Group in 1968. In 1979 the building was saved from demolition

More Information on St James

Cape Town Tourism

Cape Point Route

TripAdvisor 

Striated Skies No. 46 – Seaside Legacy

46. Seaside Legacy

Muizenberg is a sea-side suburb of Cape Town in False Bay. The “Town” was either named after the Moetjesons (a Khoi group living in the area in the late 18th century) or Willem Muijs, who was in charge of the  Dutch East India Company winter anchorage and cattle post in 1782 when the name first appeared on the map.

Over time Muizenberg gained popularity as a sea side resort, the Southern Train Line increased the number of visitors to the resort and a number of palatial homes were built. Due to the increased traffic the South African Railways decided to build a new Station in 1911 that would embody the importance of Muizenberg.  Architect J.C. Tully designed the Edwardian structure which took near on two years to build. It was opened on 7 June 1913 by the Minister of Railways and Harbours, the Honourable Henry Burton. The station was declared a National Monument under old NMC legislation in 1982.

John Collingwood Tully was born in 1855 in Newcastle-on-Tyne, England.  He articled as a Premium pupil to Robert J Johnson of Austin Johnson & Hicks, a well-known practitioner of the Gothic Revival style in Newcastle-on-Tyne for five years. Tully moved to South Africa in 1889 and worked as a clerk of works in Johannesburg and Bloemfontein before moving to Cape Town to work on Groote Schuur by Herbert Baker on the first reconstruction for CJ Rhodes (1894-1897). He was married in 1896 and entered into partnership with Spencer Waters in Cape Town in 1897. In 1910 he moved to Pietermaritzburg where is lived until he passed away in 1929, although his death certificate is not available.

Muizenberg was also the destination of the first South African airmail – sent from Kenilworth on 27 December 1911. for more history on Muizenberg and the station visit:

http://gosouthonline.co.za/muizenberg-the-golden-years/

http://www.sahistory.org.za/places/railway-station-muizenberg#sthash.PtA8G8ep.dpuf

http://www.atlanticrail.co.za/stations_history.php

http://www.artefacts.co.za/main/Buildings/bldgframes.php?bldgid=8218

I recommend a trip to Muizenberg, We will be going back next weekend to walk from Muizenberg to Kalk bay. During the summer this area is a buzz with tourists and the main road is always jammed with traffic.